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10BaseT, 10Base2, or 10Base5 :    An implementation of Ethernet IEEE standard to describe the primary characteristics of the cabling system. The 10 signifies 10 Mbits per second. Base indicates that the type of signaling used is baseband. The T at the end means that twisted-pair cable is used. The number (2, 5, or 10) at the end indicates the maximum cable length in hundreds of meters.


2 of 5 Code :    A discrete, self-checking code for encoding numeric data only. It requires loose printing tolerances. It is used for warehouse sorting systems, photofinishing envelopes, and sequentially numbered airline tickets. The character set is 0 - 9. All information is encoded in the width of the bars, and the spaces are used only to separate the individual bars.


2D matrix symbology :    A symbology that uses both the horizontal and vertical axes to encode data. Each 2D matrix code is created as a matrix of square elements, with each element being either white or black to encode data in a binary code. This allows a very large amount of data, along with extensive error detection and correction codes, to be encoded in a very small amount of space. 2D matrix symbologies cannot be read with a laser scanner and instead are read with a digital imager, which permits very fast data collection by capturing the entire symbol at once instead of scanning each component individually.


2D stacked symbology :    A symbology that consists of many linear codes stacked on top of each other, providing the ability to scan across many rows of code at once. The 2D stacked format allows a large amount of information to be condensed into a relatively small amount of space. 2D stacked symbologies can be read with any 2D code imaging device, including laser scanners that are equipped with 2D code scanning capabilities.


3270 or 5250 terminal emulation :    An application that allows Intermec devices to emulate an IBM 3270 or 5250 terminal.


3GL :    Third generation language. The name given to a generation of programming languages that are higher level than 2GL languages. Example of 3GLs are C and Pascal.


4GL :    Fourth generation language. The name given to a generation of programming languages that are higher level than 3GLs, such as SQL. 4GLs are designed to allow users to develop applications, particularly for the purpose of querying databases and producing reports.


ABC symbol :    American Blood Commission symbol, developed in 1977 by the Committee for the Commonality in Blood Banking Automation (CCBBA) as a bar code standard for automated systems in the blood service community. The symbology used in the ABC symbol is Codabar. access point A LAN product that acts as a bridge between an Intermec 2.4 GHz RF network and an Ethernet network.


Accumulate :    An operating parameter setting that allows the reader to store scanned labels in a buffer until a transmit command is entered.


Accumulate mode :    Operating mode in which the terminal or reader stores scanned information in the buffer until it receives a transmit command.


ACK :    Acknowledge character. A handshake character that indicates that a message was received.


Acknowledgment delay :    Specifies the maximum amount of time that may elapse before the controller determines that a device did not receive the message.


ADDR :    Used in Multi-Drop protocol. Each device must have a unique number (address) assigned.


Address :    Characters that are used by a device to locate another device in a network. See also group address.


Advanced Setup :    The GUI that runs on the Model 200 Controller and allows you to configure the


AFF :    Affirmative acknowledge character. This character enables or disables the handshake event, and also indicates an affirmative acknowledge to a message.


AID :    Attention identifier. A character in a data stream indicating that the user has pressed a key, such as Enter, requesting an action by the system.


Alphanumeric keypad :    TRAKKER Antares terminal The alphanumeric keypad on the terminal has 56 keys to type alphabetic and numeric characters. Although the keypad is smaller than a desktop terminal keyboard, you use special keys on the terminalís keypad and press key combinations to access all the keys and functions. Compare to large numeric keypad.


Alphanumeric keypad :    JANUS reader The alphanumeric keypad on the reader is an all-purpose keypad with 52 keys. Although the keypad is smaller than a regular PC keyboard, you use special keys on the readerís keypad and press key combinations to access all 102 keys that are available on a PC keyboard. The alphanumeric keypad is available in English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish.


ANSI :    American National Standards Institute. A non-governmental organization responsible for developing voluntary manufacturing standards.


API :    Application programming interface. A well-defined interface to routines that an application can use to request and perform system-level tasks.


APPC :    Advanced program to program communications. APPC is an LU 6.2 protocol in an SNA network. APPC supports client/server and distributed computing between IBM mainframes, and midrange and personal workstations.


Application :    1. One or more programs that perform functions required by an end user. Compare with utility. 2. A program that DCM interfaces with through its channeling system. An application is a destination where messages are deposited, such as a shop floor management program. 3. A software program that makes calls to the operating system and manipulates data files allowing a user to perform a specific job.


Application break bit :    A flag in the reader that an application checks when you turn on the JANUS reader. If the bit is not set to 1, the application will resume running. If the bit is set to 1, the application will not resume. You press the application break sequence to set the application break bit.


Application break sequence :    A series of keys you press to stop an application from resuming after you turn the JANUS reader off and then on again. Usually you use these keys when an application is locked up and you do not want to cold boot the reader to clear the memory.


Application channel file :    A file used by DCM to store transactions destined for an application that DCM has determined to be nonactive. Also referred to as an application auxiliary file.


Application companion disk :    One of the disks that Intermec ships with your JANUS reader. This disk contains applications such as Communications Manager and IRLXDESK.EXE. This disk also contains PC card drivers and utilities that control the readerís operation, prepare the reader to use the different types of PC cards, customize the reader to use the PC card software, and provide you with helpful tools.


ASCII :    American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A standard seven bit code almost always transmitted with a parity bit for a total of eight bits per character. ASCII was established by the American National Standards Institute to achieve compatibility between various types of data communication equipment. Equivalent to the International ISO 7-bit code. ASCII is the most commonly used code for non-IBM equipment. See also EBCDIC.


ASCII control character :    One of the first 32 characters (0 through 31 in decimal representation) in the ASCII character set. Each of these characters has a standard control function, such as backspace or carriage return.


ATA flash PC card :    A type of memory PC card that provides additional disk storage space, not more executable conventional memory, on a JANUS reader.


Audio connector :     The audio connector lets you attach a miniature-plug headphone or earphone into the JANUS 2010 so you can monitor the readerís audio signals in a noisy environment. The audio connector is located at the top of the reader near the wand/scanner connector. When you plug in a headphone or earphone into the audio connector, the readerís external beeper is silent.


Audio signals :    The terminal or reader has a beeper and a clicker that produce audio signals to indicate terminal status. You can change the beep volume and enable or disable the keypad clicker with configuration commands.


Audit trail :    A means of tracking messages in DCM. When the audit process is on, all DevComm transactions sent to the message handlerís channel are also written to the file DCMAUD.DAT. When the audit process is off, only failed and undeliverable transactions are written to the DCMAUD.DAT file.


Autodiscrimination :    A feature that enables a bar code reader to interpret a scanned bar code label, identifying both the symbology and the data encoded in the label. Auto-Loader A DOS utility used to change the contents of drive C. You can also use it to configure the reader to operate in any language supported by DOS NLS (National Language Support). You run Auto-Loader on a host connected to the readerís COM1 port.


Automatic mode :    A scanner mode that allows you to activate the scanner once and scan a series of bar codes. When you release the Scan button or trigger on a cabled scanner, the scanner turns off. To scan the same bar code more than once, you must release the button or trigger, or scan a different bar code before attempting a second scan.


Automatic shutoff :    A terminal or reader configuration feature that defines the maximum time the terminal stays on when there is no activity. At automatic shutoff, the contents of memory are saved and the terminal or reader resumes when it is turned on again.


Background :    1. A program running in the background cannot be directly controlled by the operator. If it is brought into the foreground, it can be directly controlled by the operator. You can run several background programs at one time, but you can only run one foreground program at a time. 2. The spaces, quiet zones, and area surrounding a printed bar code symbol.


Backing :    Silicon release liner on media to which labels are attached until ready for use.


Backlight :    A light built into the terminal or reader display that makes it easier to view the display in dimly lit environments.


BAK :    Bad Program Acknowledgment character. This character is sent from the bar code reader to indicate that the IRL program received from the host could not be successfully compiled. The program should be corrected and retransmitted.


Bandwidth :    The size in Hertz of the frequency range that a signal transmission occupies. Typical narrow band signals occupy a 25 KHz bandwidth. The 2.4 GHz radio frequency signal occupies a 1 MHz bandwidth.


Bar code :    An automatic identification technology that encodes information into an array of adjacent parallel rectangular bars and spaces of varying widths.


Bar code character :    A single group of bars and spaces that represent an individual number, letter, punctuation mark, or other symbol.


Bar code density :    Number of data characters that can be represented in a linear unit of measure. Bar code density is often expressed in characters per inch. See also density.


Bar code symbol :    A printed or photographically reproduced bar code that contains a quiet zone, a start character, one or more data characters, a stop character, and a trailing quiet zone. The data characters may include a check character.


Bar code symbology :    See symbology.


Bar height :    The bar dimension perpendicular to the bar width. Same as bar length.


Bar length :    See bar height.


Bar width :    The thickness of a bar measured from the edge closest to the symbol start character and to the trailing edge of the same bar.


Baseband :    A network in which the entire bandwidth of the transmission medium is used by a single digital signal. No modulation techniques are used.


Batch takeup :    A device that rewinds media; useful for printing batches of labels.


Battery pack locks :    The two yellow switches that, along with the battery pack release button mechanism, hold the battery pack onto a JANUS 2010.


Baud rate :    The number of discreet conditions or signal events per second. In RS-232 and RS-422/485 systems, baud rate is the same as bits per second (bps).


Beam break :    A type of read window that detects the presence of a package.


BEL :    A command character that instructs the printer to return an error status code.


BFT :    1. Binary file transfer. The process or method of transmitting a binary file (such as an executable file) from one computer to another. 2. Batch file transfer. The process of transferring the contents of a hot standby file to a batch file transfer NetComm. The NetComm transfers the data as efficiently as possible to the remote APPC application.


Bidirectional :    A bar code label that can be read from one start/stop character to the other; left to right or right to left.


Binary file :    A file that contains a sequence of 8-bit data characters or executable code. Binary files require special software for transmission. See also BFT.


Bindery emulation :    NetWare 4.0 feature that lets you emulate the bindery database system that was available in all previous versions.


BIOS :    Basic input-output system. The part of a computer operating system that handles communications between a program and external devices, such as a printer and electronic displays.


Bit :    An abbreviation for binary digit. A binary digit is a single element (0 or 1) in a binary number. Eight bits equal one byte.


Bit rate :    The speed at which bits are transmitted, usually expressed in bits per second. See bps.


Blank field :    A field that is filled with ASCII space (SP) characters. DCM uses SP rather than NULL for its empty fields in the header.


Block :    A sequence of continuous data characters or bytes transmitted as a unit. A coding procedure is usually applied for synchronization or error control purposes.


Boot (verb) :    1. Usually means to invoke a bootstrap process, which involves building up a system from some simple preliminary instructions or information. 2. A boot invokes the BIOS boot sequence, clears all memory, and performs a complete power-on self test (POST) to ensure that the hardware and peripherals are operational. A boot initializes the system hardware for use by the system firmware and loads the default configuration currently stored in flash memory.


Boot companion disk :    One of the disks that Intermec ships with your JANUS reader. The Boot Utility companion disk contains INTERSVR.EXE and other files you may need.


Boot Loader menu :    The menu on the JANUS reader used to reboot the reader, to dump the readerís RAM, to reload or upgrade the readerís software, or to use Storage mode.


BOOTP server :    Bootstrap protocol server. A device that assigns an IP address in response to a query from an IP node. In this query, the IP node supplies its physical address. The BOOTP server then checks its tables to determine the corresponding IP address.


Boot Utilities companion disk :    One of the disks that Intermec ships with your JANUS reader. This disk contains the files you need to load or upgrade the readerís system software. This disk also contains the README.DOC, a text file that describes important information about the reader that was unavailable when the manual was published. This disk also contains a batch file, INSTALL.BAT, that you can use to install Auto-Loader onto a host.


Bps :    Bits per second. The unit of measure used to describe the rate of data transmission. For example, 1200 bits per second means that there are 1200 data bits transmitted per second. See bit rate.


Bridge :    A LAN product that incorporates the first two layers of the OSI model and allows connection of networks or subnetworks with similar architectures. Intermecís 0100 and 0110 Access Points are bridges.


Broadcast :    A type of transmission in which a message sent from the host is received by many devices on the system.


BRU :    Base radio unit. A device that transmits messages over radio frequency (RF) waves between a controller and data collection devices.


Buffer :    An area of storage used to hold data being transferred from one device to another.


Byte :    A combination of eight bits in a predetermined pattern, designed to represent a digit or an alphanumeric character.


Cabled scanner :    A wand, laser scanner, or other device that scans bar code information. A cabled scanner is connected to a bar code reader or terminal with a cable rather than being built into (integrated in) the reader or terminal.


Camera window :    A window located at the front end of the 7350 optical head, through which the camera views objects on the conveyor.


CCD scanner :    Charge-coupled device scanner. A CCD scanner contains no moving parts and uses a light source to illuminate the entire symbol. A symbol is scanned electronically using the digitized image of a line through the symbol provided by the linear photodiode array.


Channel :    1. A place in RAM to deposit transactions when sending from one process to another process in a multitasking environment. A waiting place for data (mailbox). 2. The path for transmitting data from a device to the host. In RF networks, it is the frequency hopping sequence the card follows. The 2.4 GHz bandwidth can be divided into 15 different channels.


Channel search :    A method by which a device maintains its ability to transmit data by searching for an open RF frequency when its current frequency is unavailable.


Character :    1. A single group of bars and spaces that represent an individual number, letter, punctuation mark, or other symbol. 2. A graphic shape representing a letter, numeral, or symbol. 3. A letter, digit, or other symbol that is used as part of the organization, control, or representation of data.


Check character :    A character included in a message for the purpose of performing a mathematical check to ensure the accuracy of the message.


Check digit :    A character included in a bar code for the purpose of performing a mathematical check on the value of the decoded bar code to ensure its accuracy.


Checksum :    A calculated value that is used to test data integrity. Errors can occur when data is transmitted or when it is written to disk. One means of detecting such errors is the use of a checksum. A value is calculated for a given chunk of data by sequentially combining all the bytes of data with a series of arithmetic or logical operations. After the data is transmitted or stored, a new checksum is calculated and compared with the original one. If the checksums match, the transmission or storage was probably error free. If they do not match, an error occurred.


CIP :    Console Interface Program. The software interface that lets the user interact with the DCM kernel to view performance statistics or alter the configuration or operation of the DCM system.


Client :    The computer from which you will access drives, directories, files, and programs that are stored on the server. See also server.


Client host :    If DCM and the application program software are installed on physically different computers, the application programs computer is called the client host. See also server.


Cloning :    A procedure that copies the RAM contents (configuration, formats, fonts, pages, and graphics) from the memory of one printer to the memory of another.


CMOS :    Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor. A type of integrated circuit noted for its extremely low power consumption.


Coaxial :    A type of cable used to connect the controller directly to an IBM host. Coaxial cable consists of an outer layer of insulation, an outer conductor, another insulating layer, and a central conductor. See also twinaxial.


Codabar :    A self-checking, discrete bar code symbology that has these 16 characters in its set: 0 to 9, dollar sign ($), colon (:), slash (/), period (.), plus (+), and minus (-). Codabar is commonly used in libraries, blood banks, and air-parcel express applications. The American Blood Commission (ABC) Codabar requires that you retain the start/stop code digits when processing a Codabar symbol. The maximum density for a Codabar symbol is 12.8 characters per inch.


Code 11 :    A high density, discrete, numeric bar code developed by Intermec. The character set includes the numbers 0 through 9 and the dash character (-). Each character is represented by a standalone group of three bars with two included spaces. This code is not self-checking. One or two check digits provide data security. Code 11 is widely used in labeling telecommunications equipment. Its maximum density is 15 characters per inch.


Code 128 :    A variable length, continuous, and weakly self-checking bar code developed by Computer Identics. It requires loose printing tolerances. It supports the extended ASCII character set. Its high density makes it useful when printing data in a limited space. The character set includes all 128 ASCII characters. Each character is represented by 11 modules and four bar widths. Its maximum density is 12.1 alphanumeric characters per inch or 24.2 numeric characters per inch.


Code 16K :    A two-dimensional (stacked rows) ultra-high density bar code that has loose printing tolerances. Code 16K is based on Code 128 (128 squared is 16,384 or 16K). It requires a check digit. Code 16K is widely used in labeling unit-dose packaging for the health care industry; it is suitable for labeling small objects because it can encode more data in less area than many other codes. The character set includes all 128 ASCII characters.


Code 2 of 5 (2 of 5) :    A discrete, self-checking code for encoding numeric data only. The bars encode information and the spaces separate individual bars. It can achieve densities of 15 characters per inch.


Code 39 :    An alphanumeric bar code symbology that is discrete, variable length, and self-checking. It requires loose printing tolerances. It is used in manufacturing, government agencies, and health care. The character set is A Ė Z uppercase, 0 Ė 9, dollar sign ($), period (.), slash (/), percent (%), space ( ), plus, (+), and minus (-). It can be extended to full 128 character ASCII by use of a two-characterencoding scheme (see full ASCII). Its maximum density is 9.8 characters per inch.


Code 49 :    A bar code symbology that is multirow, fixed length, and continuous. It requires loose printing tolerances. It is suitable for labeling small objects because it can encode more data in less area than other codes. The character set is all 128 ASCII characters. Its maximum density is 93.3 alphanumeric characters per inch or 154.3 numeric characters per inch.


Code 93 :    A bar code symbology that is discrete, variable length, and self-checking. It requires loose printing tolerances. It can be used interchangeably with Code 39 when higher density printing is required. The character set is the same as Code 39: A Ė Z uppercase, 0 Ė 9, dollar sign ($), period (.), slash (/), percent (%), space ( ), plus, (+), and minus (-). It can be extended to full 128 character ASCII by use of a four-character encoding scheme (see full ASCII). Its maximum density is 14.8 characters per inch.


Code One :    A 2D matrix symbology that is especially useful for applications such as small parts labels that do not provide sufficient space for linear bar codes. In addition to data storage and error correction symbols, each Code One symbol contains a set of horizontal lines in the center, called a finder pattern, that helps readers quickly locate and identify each symbol. Code One symbols also contain vertical reference bars to help readers locate the relative positions of each data bit.


Cold boot :    One of two ways to boot the reader; compare to warm boot. A cold boot invokes the BIOS boot sequence, which verifies that the 256K flash system image is not corrupt, clears all memory, and performs a complete power-on self test (POST) to ensure that the hardware and peripherals are operational. The cold boot initializes the system hardware for use by system software, loads the default configuration, runs AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS, and loads DOS. Because the physical RAM drive is initialized, all files on drive E are lost. You may cold boot the reader to clear the readerís conventional memory, break out of an application that is locked in an infinite loop, or recover from an error condition.


COM port :    Commonly used short form of communications port. COM ports offer serial communications, which means that data is transmitted one bit at a time over a single line from one computer to another.


Communications Manager :    An application on the reader that lets you transmit and receive files, and see the status of the readerís COM port. This application is available on the Application companion disk 3.


Communications protocol :    A set of rules or standards designed to enable computers to connect with each other and exchange data. An example of a communications protocol is Point-to-Point protocol.


Communications Utilities :    Transmit and receive functions that you can call with PSK functions or software interrupts. Included in the Reader Services programs.


Compound Function key :    The Compound Function key is a special key on the JANUS keypad. You use the A key to access characters or perform functions that do not have an actual key on the keypad. When you press A, the key is held in a buffer and the Compound Function key icon appears on the readerís display. Once you press a key other than A, the key combination is entered into the reader and the icon disappears from the display.


Concatenated code :    A subset of Codabar symbology. Two bar code labels are read as one where the stop code of the first label matches the start code of the second label.


Concatenation :    The operation of joining two or more character strings together, end to end.


Configuration :    The selected parameters that determine the operating characteristics of an electronic device.


Configuration command :    A configuration command changes the way the terminal or reader operates. You can enter a configuration command by typing on the keypad, by scanning a bar code label, or by sending a command from a device on the network.


Configuration file :    A configuration file is an ASCII text file that contains settings for some or all of the readerís configuration parameters.


Configuration Manager :    A Reader Services program on the reader that maintains the readerís current configuration file, ensures that the reader operates according to that configuration, and lets you change the configuration file.


Configuration mode :    Mode used to select the parameters of the reader. One of two modes available in the reader.


Conman :    Configuration and control manager. The software interface that enables the user to interact with the DCM message handler to view performance statistics or alter the configuration or operation of the DCM system.


Console :    A terminal or monitor used to configure the 9180 controller and to supervise the RF data collection system.


Contact scanner :    A scanner that requires physical contact between the code medium and the scanner.


Continuous code :    A bar code or symbol in which the space between two characters (intercharacter gap) is part of the code, such as USD-1 (Interleaved 2 of 5 Code). A continuous code is the opposite of a discrete code.


Contrast :    Amount of difference in reflectance between the dark bars and the light spaces of a bar code; measured by print contrast signal (PCS).


Control mode :    A reader mode you use to temporarily change some of the display parameters at the DOS prompt or when running an application. The parameters are reset when you boot the reader.


Control panel :    A panel on the printer containing the operating and menu keys, liquid crystal display, and indicator lights.


Controller :    An electronic device that interfaces between the data collection devices and the host.


Conventional memory :    The reader has 1MB of battery-backed dynamic RAM. The first 640K is conventional memory and is virtually the same as that of a PC. You can use this memory to run applications.


CRC :    Cyclic redundancy check. The CRC is a data block check used to enhance data integrity. A CRC calculation is performed on the contents of each received RF message. If the result of this calculation compares with the received CRC, then the message was received without error.


CrossBar :    Intermec proprietary data collection network consisting of a 9161 port concentrator or a 9154 controller, data collection devices, printers, and input devices.


CRRM :    Computer response required mode. An operating parameter that, when enabled, requires the reader to await a response from the host before sending more data. The response from the host is transmitted using the selected protocol.


CSMA/CA :    Carrier sense multiple access/collision avoidance. CSMA/CA is a protocol that allows each node to sense whether or not a channel is in use before attempting to transmit information. CA is an algorithm by which channel time is reserved to avoid collisions.


CSMA/CD :    Carrier sense multiple access/collision detection. CSMA/CD is a protocol that allows each node to sense whether or not a channel is in use before attempting to transmit information. If it detects no other carrier, it transmits. If a collision is detected, the device stops transmitting, waits a random length of time, and begins transmitting again.


CTS :    Clear to send. Used in communications protocol to verify a ready state.


CTS/RTS :    Clear to send/ready to send. A type of hardware flow control. The reader or terminal signals the serial port device when ready to receive data (CTS). The reader or device checks with the serial port device when ready to send data (RTS).


Current screen :    The current screen in screen mapping refers to the host screen you are currently defining. You must select a current screen before you can define host screen fields, regions, and messages.


Current transaction :    The current transaction in screen mapping refers to the transaction for which you are currently defining script. The current transaction may send data to different host screens. You must select a current transaction before you can define host screens, host screen fields, regions, and messages.


Cursor keypad :    A set of keys on the reader that allows you to move the cursor around the screen.


Cutter :    An optional device for the printer that cuts individual labels and drops them into a tray.


Data bits :    The number of bits used for data. Generally set at seven or eight. Used in communication protocol. Set according to the host configuration.


Data block :    A sequence of continuous data character or bytes transmitted as a unit.


Data collection device :    A device in the data collection system that collects data from bar codes and sends it to the host.


Data Entry mode :    The default operating mode for a bar code reader. The reader waits to receive data or commands from a label, keypad, or host.


Data file :    The collection of data and printer commands that, when sent to the printer, is merged with a format file to print a label.


Data line print :    A mode of operation in which the printer prints each command (accompanied by its ASCII code) that it receives from the host.


Data transmission :    An event in which a block of data is transmitted from one device to another. data transmission event A communications event where data is transmitted from one device to another.


DCE :    Data communication equipment that provides the communication connection function in a computer environment (such as a modem).


DCM :    Data Collection Manager. An Intermec connectivity product that lets you set up communications between runtime applications and the data input stations. A variety of communication protocols are supported, including TCP/IP, APPC, and screen mapping.


Default configuration :    The values set for each configuration parameter when the device is shipped.


Default parameters :    A set of configuration parameters that are active when the device is shipped.


Default router :    The IP address of a router that is used when a device sends a packet to another subnet or when a device sends a packet to an unknown destination.


Density :    The amount of information encoded in a given area. See also bar code density.


Destination :    Either the logical name of a device or the name of an application programís channel. Anyplace where a transaction can be sent.


DevComm :    Device communication process. Provides communications between a host and a particular device (readers, printers, controllers, concentrators). There is a DevComm for each attached device per port. In a given installation, there will be one port for each device required, each running a copy of a device DevComm. One module is created (spawned) for each communications port when DCM is initialized.


Device :    Generic term for any piece of equipment, such as a terminal, a reader, a printer, or a controller.


Device address :    A type of address that is used by the host to identify a particular data collection device. This address can also refer to the deviceís physical address.


Device driver :    A software component that controls an external device. For example, a PC card device driver controls how the reader accesses the PC card.


DFM :    Data Flow Manager. The Intermec software product that routes the information from source to destination.


Digital :    Pertaining to data in the form of digits. In signals, digital refers to a signal that assumes one of a predetermined set of values, such as 0 to 1, as opposed to a signal that may assume any value over a continuing range of values, such as an analog signal.


Direct sequencing :    A spread spectrum technique by which the transmitted signal is spread over a particular frequency range.


Direct thermal :    A method of thermal printing in which images are printed when heat from the thermal printhead produces a black mark on the media.


Direct-connect :    A device that is hard-wired to a port of the host.


Dirt :    The presence of relatively nonreflective foreign particles embedded in a sheet of paper. The size and lack of reflectance of the particles may be such that they will be mistaken for inked areas by an optical scanner.


Discrete code :    A bar code symbol in which the intercharacter gap is not part of the code, and is allowed to vary dimensionally within wide tolerance limits. It is the opposite of continuous code.


Display :    Two-line screen on the control panel that displays messages such as printer status, menus, commands, and errors.


DLE :    ASCII Data Link Exception character. It causes the character that follows it to be received as data, even if it is a protocol character. It allows for the use of control characters in preambles, data strings, and configuration command strings.


DLL :    Dynamic link library. A subroutine package that is bound to an application at load time or during execution, rather than at link time when the program is created.


Domain :    The area within a LAN that defines a region administered by a controller or server. The domain is also called a subnetwork.


DOS code pages :    A code page is a table that relates binary character codes used by a program to keys on the keypad or to characters on the display. All international keypads are translated using an installed DOS code page that contains the standard ASCII character set and a set of national language characters specific to the language the code page supports.


Downline :    1. A device that is at the terminal end of a connection to the computer is referred to as being downline. When devices are connected to a computer, they are connected in a line. Downline is a direction relative to the computer. See also upline. 2. If more than one computer is connected in a line, the upline computers usually handle data processing and the downline computers usually handle data collection and sometimes some data preprocessing.


DRAM :    Abbreviation for dynamic random access memory. A type of RAM that stores information in integrated circuits containing capacitors. Since capacitors lose their charge over time, DRAM boards include logic to recharge, or ďrefresh,Ē the RAM chips continuously. Since their internal circuitry is simple, DRAMs are more commonly used than static RAMs, even though they are slower. DRAM can hold approximately four times as much data as a static RAM chip of the same complexity. The reader has 1MB of battery-backed DRAM.


Drive :    An electromechanical device that reads from and writes to disks. The three types of common disk drives are floppy disk drives, hard disk drives, and PC card drives.


Driver :    1. A software module that controls an input/output port or external device. 2. Software or firmware that translates operating system requests (such as input/output requests) into a format that is recognizable by specific hardware, such as adapters.


DTE :    Data transmission equipment. A computer or terminal that provides data in the form of digital signals at its output.


EAN :    European article numbering; now also called IAN (international article numbering). International standard bar code for retail food packages corresponding to the universal product code (UPC) in the United States. UPC is a subset of EAN, and a reader equipped to read EAN can also read UPC. A reader equipped to read UPC may not decode EAN. The EAN and UPC symbols were developed by IBM and introduced into the market in 1971. The U.S. adopted UPC in 1973; EAN was adopted in 1976.


EBCDIC :    Extended binary coded decimal interchange code. Standard eight bit code developed by IBM. See also ASCII.


Echoplex :    Communication environment in which full duplex terminals work. Any data sent to the host is echoed back to the device that sent the data.


Edge Trigger mode :    The laser only turns on or off when you pull the triggerĖit completely ignores the trigger release. Thus, if you pull the trigger, it will go on and stay on when you release the trigger. Pulling the trigger a second time will cause the laser to go off. If the laser is on, the timeout and number of decodes per trigger event operate normally and will turn the laser off. Edge Trigger mode is most often used in remote triggering applications. See also Level Trigger mode.


Edge triggering :    A scanner trigger configuration that makes the laser turn on after you pull the trigger and stay on until you pull it a second time. Simply releasing the trigger does not turn the laser off. If the laser is left on, the scanner timeout turns the laser off. Contrast with level triggering.


EEPROM :    Electrically erasable programmable read only memory.


Element :    A single binary position in a character; dimensionally the narrowest width in a character bar or space. A generic term used to refer to either a bar or a space.


EMM :    Expanded Memory Manager. Software that makes expanded memory available to EMS-compatible DOS programs.


EmComm :    Emulator communications. EmComms allow transaction data from a data collection device to be mapped to host applications running in a 3270 or 5250 terminal emulator.


Emulation :    An operating mode in which the printer has the operating characteristics of another printer.


Encoded area :    The total lineal dimension occupied by all characters of a code pattern, including the start/stop characters and data.


END :    End of IRL program/compile character. Sent by the host to tell the reader that the program has been downloaded and to wait for the RUN command.


End device :    See data collection device.


Environment variable :    A specification in a program that defines an operating parameter, such as the command path.


EOF :    End of file character. Attached to the last record transmitted in a block of records and after the EOR, if the EOF character field is enabled.


EOM :    End of message character. Sent at the end of reader messages and at the end of host messages. The transmitted and received EOM characters can be defined separately.


EOP :    End of program block/continue character. Sent by the host after a block of IRL program statements to tell the reader that another block of IRL statements is coming.


EOR :    End of record character. Attached to the end of every record transmitted by the polled device if the EOR character field is enabled.


EPROM :    Erasable programmable read only memory. A special type of ROM that can be erased by exposing the chip to ultraviolet light. It can be reprogrammed after it is erased.


Error message :    A message from a device or program advising the user of an error that requires intervention to solve. For example, if you receive the error message ďUnable to establish connection to host. Session ended.Ē when you turn on the terminal, you may need to configure the terminal.


ESD :    Electrostatic discharge. Transient, rapid transfer of charge between bodies at different electrostatic potentials, either: caused by direct contact, by arc-over of near proximity, or induced by an electrostatic field.


ESD mat :    A flexible work surface composed of vinyl or rubber with an added component to allow static to drain from its surface to the ground through a connected grounding cord.


Ethernet :    A type of LAN that allows the transmission of computer data, audio data, and video data. Ethernet uses the access method known as CSMA/CD (carrier sense multiple access with collision detection). Refer to the IEEE 802.3 standard for the specifications.


ETSI :    European Telecommunications Standards Institute. European agency responsible for setting and enforcing regulations associated with telecommunications.


Execute :    To perform an instruction or a computer program.


Expanded memory :    Memory above 1MB that requires an expanded memory board and expanded memory manager.


Extended memory :    System memory above 1MB. The reader is initially configured with 64K of extended memory available, which is allocated for use by Intermec applications (IC.EXE and IRL). The reader provides extended memory for control and access to RAM above 1MB. The extended memory conforms to XMS specification 2.0. Extended memory is initialized and managed by the HIMEM.SYS driver.


Extended memory manager :    Software that makes extended memory available to DOS programs. For example, you must run an extended memory manager such as HIMEM.SYS on the reader to create and use a physical RAM drive.


Fast Setup :    A quick configuration program that runs on the controller GUI. Generally, Fast Setup is used to demonstrate the controller, but you can also use it to configure your network if it is a simple one. See also Advanced Setup.


FCC :    Federal Communications Commission. U.S. federal government agency responsible for setting and enforcing regulations associated with telecommunications.


FDC :    1. Factory data collection system. 2. Floppy disk controller, which regulates the floppy disk.


Feed :    A printer control panel button that advances the media.


Feed/pause :    A printer control panel button that advances the media and causes the printer to pause printing.


Field :    1. A graphic element that is the basic unit of a format. The four basic types of fields are bar code, graphic, line, and text. 2. An area of a host window to which data can be written.


Field-formatted screen :    A window on a host such as an AS/400 in which input is restricted to specific areas.


FIFO control register (FCR) :    First in/first out control register. The FCR contains a hex value that controls how the UART buffer operates. You may need to configure the JANUS reader/device to restore a hex value for the FCR in case you turn off the reader while running a communications application that uses UART 16x550 mode.


File :    A collection of related records. DCM recognizes and routes files that have the extensions: .IRL, .CMD, .DAT, and .PF.


Firmware :    Software routines stored in read only memory (ROM). Unlike random access memory (RAM), ROM stays intact even without electrical power. See also software.


Fixed data field :    Bar code and text fields that never vary from one label to the next; the data in a fixed field is a permanent part of the format.


Fixed format :    A format in which the data never varies from one label to the next, such as with a return address label. A fixed format needs no additional data to print a label.


Fixed length :    Characteristic of a bar code symbology in which the number of characters per symbol is predetermined. Opposite of variable length.


Flag character :    A character with a data format of fixed position, with contents that vary over a specified range of values; each value representing significant information that is presented to a data processing system.


Flash memory :    A type of nonvolatile memory. Flash memory must be erased in blocks and is commonly used as a supplement to or replacement for hard disks in portable computers and data collection devices.


Flash PC card :    A type of memory PC card that provides additional disk storage space, not more executable conventional memory, on the reader. Flash cards retain their data without the use of a backup battery.29


Flash ROM drive :    Drives C and D on the reader are ROM drives that are implemented in flash memory. Drive C is upgradeable, but has limited write capability. Drive D cannot be modified. Both drives use a file allocation table (FAT) type format.


Flow control :    A method for controlling the flow of data between the reader and the serial port. It stops the transmitting device from sending data when the receiving device buffer fills up and starts it again when the buffer empties. This can be done through software (XON/XOFF) or hardware (CTS/RTS).


Font :    A character set of a given type size and style.


Foreground :    Programs running in the foreground can be directly controlled (with the keyboard) by the operator. Several background programs may be running simultaneously, but only one foreground program can run at a time.


Form feed :    A printer control panel button that advances the media.


Format :    The geometric construction rules that define a particular bar code or symbol.


Format file :    A collection of printer commands and data that determines the arrangement of fields on a label.


Frequency hopping :    A spread spectrum technique by which the band is divided into a number of channels and the transmissions hop from channel to channel in a prespecified sequence.


FRR :    First read rate. Percentage representing the number of successful reads per 100 attempts for a particular symbol; used as an approximation of ďhuman friendlinessĒ of the bar code reader and symbol to the operational environment.


Full ASCII :    An operating mode that sets the reader to properly decode Code 39 or Code 93 labels containing data that may include any of the 128 ASCII characters.


Full duplex :    A data communication term pertaining to a simultaneous two-way independent transmission. See also half duplex.


Function Left key :    The Function Left key is a special key on the keypad. When you press this key, it is held in a buffer and the Function Left key icon appears on the terminalís display. Once you press a key other than Function Left, the key combination is entered into the terminal and the icon disappears from the display.


Function Right key :    The Function Right key is a special key on the keypad. When you press this key, it is held in a buffer and the Function Right key icon appears on the terminalís display. Once you press a key other than Function Right, the key combination is entered into the terminal and the icon disappears from the display.


Gateway :    A LAN product that allows devices on two different subnets to communicate with each other.


Graphic :    A bitmap picture downloaded to the printer by the host before printing.


Graphics mode :    One of two display modes on the reader. When the reader is set to use Graphics mode, you see a 128 x 160 pixel display size. You can use the readerís CGA display as a viewport to move around and see a 200 x 640 pixel virtual display. Contrast with Text mode.


Group address :    A type of address that is used by the host to locate two or more devices.


GUI :    Graphical user interface.


Half duplex :    A data communication term pertaining to an alternate, one direction at a time, transmission. See also full duplex.


Hand-held scanner :    A scanner held and operated by a human. The scanner is moved to the object to be scanned, instead of moving the object close to the scanner.


Handshake event :    A communication event that signifies the completion of a data block transmission. The exchange signifies either an affirmative acknowledge (AFF) or a negative acknowledge (NEG). The handshake event is enabled by defining the AFF character to be other than NULL. Some computers use the characters XON and XOFF as handshaking characters.


Hardware :    Physical equipment, such as mechanical, magnetic, electrical, or electronic devices. Contrast with software or method of use.


Height sensor :    Part of the 7350 Wide Area Bar Code Scanner. Two height sensors, a transmitter, and a receiver send signals across the conveyor belt. When these signals are broken by a package, the packageís height can be determined.


HIBC :    Health industry bar code standard. A modified version of Code 39 that has 43 characters, utilizes the Modulus 43 check character, and reserves some character combinations for special usage. high memory area (HMA) HMA is a 64K block of memory, starting 16 bytes below the 1024K mark, and is the first 64K of extended memory. Since HMA can only hold one item, the first program that requests HMA uses it, regardless of the size of the program.


Home :    The viewportís home position is the upper left corner of the TE or application screen.


Hop :    See repeat hop.32


Host application :    An application running remotely on a host.


Host busy :    The condition in which the host is processing a request and has not responded, or has not updated the screen. On a 3270 terminal, the OIA shows X-SYSTEM, X-CLOCK, or X-[]. On a 5250 terminal, the OIA shows II (Input Inhibited).


Host :    1. A PC or other computer connected to device. 2. If several computers are connected together on a network, the controlling computer is the host. A host can be a desktop, laptop, or notebook PC.


HOSTS file :    A database that contains a list of remote hostsí IP addresses and their logical names (aliases) that any device on the network can reach.


Hot standby file :    If DCM sends a transaction to an application and it does not respond to DCM within a specified period, the application is consider inactive by DCM and any transactions for that application are sent to a temporary file called a hot standby file.


Hot Standby mode :    The mode an application is considered to be in by the Model 200 Controller when the controller sends a transaction to an application, and it does not respond within the time set in the Hot Standby timeout. Whenever a device tries to send this application a transaction, the controller can send the device a Hot Standby message. Until the application becomes active again, any transactions destined for that application are written to a Hot Standby file. When the application becomes active, the controller sends it all the transactions in its Hot Standby file.


Human-readable :    A character, number, or symbol printed in a font that can be read by a human; as opposed to bar code symbology that can only be read by a machine. See text.


IAN :    International article numbering. Same as UPC. See EAN.


Image bands :    A portion of an image, in the shape of a strip of the image. A certain number of image bands are stored in memory before printing begins. This method allows printing and imaging to take place simultaneously.


Image file :    An image file contains all the files you want to load onto the readerís drive C. Because drive C is a ROM drive that is implemented in flash memory, you can use DOS commands to read from drive C, but you must use special utilities to write to drive C.


Imaging :    The process of generating a picture of the label in printer memory.


Imaging processor :    Part of the 7350 Wide Area Bar Code Scanner. The imaging processor decodes all the scanned information and provides an image of each scanned bar code.


Increment/decrement field :    Bar code or text fields the printer automatically changes from one label to the next. For example, a batch of labels with serial number text or bar code fields that change from 001, to 002, to 003, and so on.


Index :    To move from the start of the label to the start of print. With continuous media, to advance the media over the label gap to the edge of the next label.


Input device :    A wand or laser scanner or other device that scans bar code information into the terminal or reader.


Input/output (I/O) PC card :    A type of PC card, such as a modem card, that can be used to connect the reader to another device for communications. I/O cards comply with PCMCIA Standard 2.1.


Input Manager :    A Reader Services program that you use as an interface for all data input and output from the readerís COM ports, wand, scanner, and keypad. The Input Manager handles all power management tasks during data input and output.34


Interactive :    A computer session that provides immediate feedback to input. Two-way communications between two devices.


Interactive Configuration :    A menu-driven application that lets you view the readerís current configuration, modify parameters, create configuration files, and configure the reader with any configuration file.


Intercharacter delay :    Amount of time between transmitting successive characters.


Intercharacter gap :    The space between the last element of one character and the first element of the adjacent character of a discrete bar code symbol.


Interface type :    An object in Conman that identifies and describes one of the following types of physical entities: file, database, application, and screen mapping. A unique name identifies each interface type.


Interference :    A situation that occurs when an unwanted RF signal occupies the same frequency band as a desired signal.


Interleaved 2 of 5 Code :    A bar code developed by Intermec for Computer Identics that encodes the ten digits 0 through 9. The name Interleaved 2 of 5 is derived from the method used to encode two characters. In this symbol, two characters are paired, using bars to represent the first character and the interleaved spaces to represent the second character. Each character has two wide elements and three narrow elements, for a total of five elements. The specification for this bar code is set forth in MHI/AIR USD 1. It can achieve a maximum density of 7.8 characters per inch.


Interleaved bar code :    A bar code in which characters are paired together using bars to represent the first character and spaces to represent the second. For example, USS-I 2/5. See also continuous code.35


Interlnk :    A DOS communications program on the reader that you use to access the drives on a host as if they were on the reader, and vice versa.


Interlock switch :    A switch embedded in the readerís case that locks the battery into place. The interlock switch is engaged when the battery pack locks are closed. If the interlock switch is not engaged, the reader will not operate.


Interpretive field :    A text field that describes the data in the associated bar code field.


Intersvr :    A companion application to Interlnk that runs on the computer that acts as the server while Interlnk runs on the computer that is the client.


IP :    1. Internet protocol. This protocol provides a method for transmitting blocks of data (IP datagrams) between hosts. 2. For the Model 200 Controller, this is the protocol for the network layer in the TCP/IP protocol. It acts as a router for frames and is also responsible for frame addressing. It verifies it has all the frames to pass to the TCP layer and that they are in the correct order.


IP address :    An internal TCP/IP protocol stack variable. This address is a network level address assigned to each device in a TCP/IP network.


Ips :    Inches per second. A measurement of print speed that measures the number of inches of media that is printed each second.


IPX :    1. Internet packet exchange protocol. This protocol provides a means for message packets to be exchanged on an internetwork. 2. For the Model 200 Controller, this is the protocol for the Network layer in SPX/IPX protocol. It provides a way for packets to be exchanged on a network. It acts as a router for messages to other computers, it directs incoming data to the correct local process, and is also in charge of addressing.


IRL :    Interactive reader language. A high level programming language developed by Intermec for their bar code readers.


IRL Desktop :    The IRL operating environment on the JANUS reader is called the IRL Desktop. This application lets you use the reader to transmit, receive, and clear data files, and to download and run IRL programs.


IRQ :    Interrupt request. Hardware lines over which devices such as the readerís input/output ports, the keypad, and disk drivers can send request-attention signals (commonly called ďinterruptsĒ). IRQs suspend current operations, save current work, and transfer control to a routine called an interrupt handler, which causes a specific set of instructions to be carried out by the computerís microprocessor.


ISA :    Industry standard architecture. Computer circuit board design that allows various adapters to be added to the system by means of inserting plug-in cards into expansion slots.


ISO :    International Organization for Standardization. An internationally accepted 7-bit character code. (The U.S. version is ASCII.)


JP :    Jumper pin. A prong used as a jumper contact to PCBs or cards. See also jumper.


Jumper :    A short length of conductor used to make a connection between two points or terminals in a circuit or to provide a path around a break in a circuit.


Junction box :    A box used for connecting height sensor cables to the imaging processor.


Key mark/trigger :    A code bit that tells the scanner when the code is in position to be read.


Keyboard equivalent :    The keycode representing the key pressed that is sent by the keyboard to the workstation. The reader has a table of ASCII characters that correspond to the keys on the keyboard. When an ASCII character is scanned, the reader transmits the keycode to the workstation.37


Keyed connection :    A detachable connection that is restricted in how it is positioned on a pin.


Keypad buffer :    An area of memory that saves a limited number of operator keystrokes.


Keypad clicker :    A feature that makes the terminal or reader produce an audible click every time you press a key. This feature can be enabled or disabled with the Keypad Clicker configuration command.


Label :    The part of the media on which data is printed.


Label format :    The design of a bar code label; the arrangement of the text, lines and bar codes on a label.


Label gap :    The space between labels on die-cut label stock.


Ladder :    A method of bar code printing in which the bars in the bar code are printed one at a time, in a series. The bar code appears along the length of the label. Used to be referred to as ďpicket.Ē


LAN :    Local area network. A network that is within a small radius, such as an office building. Compare to WAN. See also Ethernet, peer-to-peer network, and Token Ring.


Large numeric keypad :    One of the keypads available on the reader. The large numeric keypad has 34 keys and is available in English. The number keys are larger to make it easier to enter a lot of numeric data. Compare to alphanumeric keypad.


Laser :    Light amplification by the stimulated emission of radiation. A laser is a coherent, monochromatic light source produced by directing a light beam repeatedly through an active material so that it becomes amplified, and then directing the beam into a narrow cone of divergence. The active material converts energy into laser light, a pumping source provides power or energy, and separate optics direct the beam through the active material and then into a narrow cone of divergence.


Laser scanner :    An optical bar code reading device that uses a low energy laser light beam to examine a spatial pattern, one part after another. It then generates analog or digital signals corresponding to the pattern. Laser scanners are often used in mark sensing, pattern recognition, character recognition, and bar code recognition. The laser scanner converts bar code symbols to electrical signals for input to a bar code reader decoder for processing and subsequent output through a data communications interface.


LAT protocol :    Local area transport protocol.


Legal length :    A parameter in the configuration that determines which lengths of a specified symbology can be scanned and decoded.


Level Trigger mode :    The laser turns on when you pull the trigger and stays on until you release the trigger. See also Edge Trigger mode.


Level triggering :    A scanner trigger configuration that makes the laser turn on after you activate the scanner and stay on until you release the Scan button or the trigger on a cabled scanner. Contrast with edge triggering.


Libraries :    A collection of programs and packages that are made available for common use within some environment; individual items need not be related. A typical library might contain compilers, utility programs, packages for mathematical operations, etc. Usually it is only necessary to reference the library program to cause it to be automatically incorporated in a userís program. (Dictionary of Computing)39


Link station :    A link station exists at the end point of a logical connection. It can send to and receive data from other link stations.


List box :    A drop-down list of all the existing values for a field. A list box is usually attached to an input field in a dialog box so the application user can enter a value by selecting from a list.


Lithium backup battery :    The reader contains a lithium backup battery that is designed to back up the RAM and clock while you remove a discharged NiCad battery pack and insert a charged battery pack. The lithium battery will provide backup battery power for 3 to 4 years if you correctly manage power on the reader.


Lithium-ion battery pack :    Provides the main power source to operate the terminal. The lithium-ion battery pack is rechargeable and charges the backup battery when required.


Local :    Indicates the same computer as the reference point.


Local address :    See device address.


Local application :    If DCM and the application program software are installed on the same computer, the computer is called a local computer or host (also server host).


Local editing error :    An error that occurs when a user performs an operation in a field that is not supported by the fieldís properties or definition. No data is sent when a local editing error occurs. For example, a local editing error occurs when a user enters characters in a numeric-only field.


Logic box :    See imaging processor.40


Logical COM4 :    Logical COM4 is the communications port for RF communications in a JANUS 2010 with an RF Back. This COM port is different from COM4, which is the Type II PC card drive when it contains a modem card. Accessing an RF network through logical COM4 does not conflict with accessing a serial communications network through COM4.


Logical partition :    A logically distinct portion of memory or a storage device that functions as though it were a physically separate unit.


LRC :    Longitudinal redundancy check character. This character is an error checking character that is optionally appended to transmitted blocks of data and optionally checked on received blocks of data. LRC provides horizontal error checking of data blocks received and transmitted by the controller. LRC performs an exclusive OR of the data bits, excluding the SOM, but including the received or transmitted EOM characters.


LSL :    Link support layer. This layer serves as an intermediary between ODI and the link driver that supplies an interface between the network board and the rest of the operating system.


LU :    Logical unit. LUs define the name by which devices are known throughout the SNA network. An LU is SNA software that accepts APPC verbs and acts on those verbs. A single LU can provide services for multiple transaction programs. Multiple LUs can be active in a node simultaneously. Intermec uses LU type 6.2 that supports communication between a host application and the Model 200 Controller terminal session manager.


Main host screen :    In screen mapping, the host screen that your startup keystroke sequence brings you to and where all data collection for the script starts. This screen is always the first screen to receive data from a transaction.


Main menu :    The menu from which all commands are available.


Manufacturer's identification number :    In the UPC systems, the four- or five-digit number assigned to a manufacturer by the Uniform Product Council, Inc. This number appears as the left half of the UPC number.


Margin :    The distance between the edge of a label and where the printing starts on that label. The margin is also called the quiet zone. See also top-of-form.


Media :    The label stock on which the printer prints labels. Media can be made of plain paper, polyester, thermally reactive paper, or other materials with adhesive backing.


Memory cards :    See PC card.


Menu :    A list of commands accessible through the control panel on the printer. Menus contain submenus and selections of printer features.


Message :    1. A unit of information that may be composed of one or more data fields. 2. The data portion of a transaction.


Message handler :    The central process in the DCM software. The message handler performs verification and routing services. All transactions going to and from data collection hardware are directed through the message handler.


Message type :    A string of characters followed by a delimiter that identifies a transaction as being of a specified type. It could also be referred to as a transaction identifier.


Mil :    One thousandth of an inch (0.001 inch), or approximately 0.0254 millimeter. Bar code bar widths are commonly referred to as being a certain number of mils wide.


Misread/bad read :    A condition that occurs when the data output of a reader does not agree with the encoded data presented.42


MkImage :    One of two programs you can use to change the contents of drive C. MkImage creates an image file containing the files you want on drive C. You can run MkImage on a host, on the readerís PC card drive, or on the readerís RAM drive.


Mnemonic code :    An acronym or abbreviation for a computer instruction, routine, or format. For example, <STX> represents the start of text.


Model 200 Controller :    A network controller that connects Intermecís wired and wireless products to your local area network or directly to a host.


Modem :    Short for modulator/demodulator. A communications device that converts one form of a signal to another that is suitable for transmission over communication circuits, typically from digital to analog and then from analog to digital.


Modem card :    A Type II PC card that converts one form of a signal to another, which is suitable for transmission over communications circuits, typically from digital to analog and then from analog to digital.


Modular connector :    A cable device connector similar to a telephone jack connector.


Module :    The narrowest nominal bar or space in a bar code. Wider bars and spaces are often specified as multiples of one module.


Modulus 43 check character :    Check character derivation method for Code 39.


MS-DOS Programs companion disk :    One of the disks that Intermec ships with your JANUS reader. This disk contains commands and device drivers. Some of these commands and drivers are already installed on the reader. This disk also contains applications, such as INTERLNK.EXE, MkImage, and PutImage.43


MSI code :    A bar code symbology that is a modified version of Plessey code. It is fixed length, continuous, and non self-checking. This code is used to mark retail shelves for inventory reordering. The character set is 0 Ė 9 plus additional symbols.


Multi-Drop address :    The address of the COM port when you are using Multi-Drop communications protocol. Each Multi-Drop address has unique POL and SEL characters that are automatically set when you configure the address.


Multi-Drop protocol :    Communications protocol similar to Polling Mode D, used when connecting multiple readers to a port concentrator. In Multi-Drop, each reader on the line must be assigned a unique POL and SEL character. Multi-Drop operates only at 2400 baud or higher and cannot be modified.


Multiple-read symbol :    A bar code symbol that takes the form <start code space data stop code>. Multiple-read symbol are stored in the readerís buffer until a command to transmit is received or until a regular symbol (a symbol with no leading space) is scanned. See regular symbol.


Multitasking :    The process of switching from one operation to another quickly. This results in the appearance that several programs are running at the same time.


Named pipe :    A high-level interprocess communication facility that allows bidirectional, multipoint communications between processes. In an OS/2 LAN Server environment, named pipes may also be used to communicate across the LAN. Remote named pipes use NETBIOS as the underlying communications protocol.


NAU :    Network addressable unit. A network address that allows a device to communicate with IBM hosts in a 3270 network.


NEG :    Negative acknowledgment character. Indicates a negative acknowledgment to a solicitation event or a data transmission event.44


NetComm :    1. Network communications process. Enables communication between DCM and remote application programs. NetComs are necessary when the target application is operating on a node that DCM does not reside on (remote node.) 2. Applications communicate with the Model 200 Controller through network communications processes called NetComms. NetComms are responsible for safely routing data from remote applications across a network to the controller and back.


Network :    A collection of devices that can store and manipulate electronic data, interconnected in such a way that their users can store, retrieve, and share information with each other.


Network administrator :    The person who is responsible for the installation, management, and control of a network.


Network ID :    A number used by a device during channel search to locate the controllerís RFNC address.


Network interface card :    NIC. An adapter card that is installed in the controller that allows it to connect to a network (for example, Ethernet, Token Ring, Twinaxial). The card contains both the hardware to accommodate the cables and the software to use the networkís protocols. The NIC is also called a network adapter card.


Network node :    An end point in a network to which or from which data can be routed. Usually this is a workstation or host.


Nibblized :    A software term that refers to the practice of grouping bits into sets of four, which are called nibbles. Usually bits are grouped into sets of eight, which are called bytes.


NiCad backup battery :    The terminal contains a rechargeable NiCad backup battery that is designed to back up all memory and the real-time clock while you change the lithium-ion main battery pack. The NiCad battery will provide backup battery power for a maximum of 1 month if a fully-charged main battery pack is installed, or for a maximum of 3 days if a main battery pack is not installed.


NiCad battery pack :    Provides the main power source to operate the reader. The battery pack contains rechargeable nickel-cadmium (NiCad) battery cells.


NLS :    National Language Support. A DOS feature that provides country-specific information and character set (code page) switching for international language support.


Nonvolatile :    Refers to memory that is saved when power is lost or turned off. See also volatile.


Novell user name :    Parameter that identifies the user to the Novell software running on a remote host.


Null modem cable :    A cable that connects two computers and allows transmission of data between them without requiring a modem.


Number pad :    A set of keys on the reader that allows you to move the cursor around the screen and to type numbers and mathematical symbols. The readerís number pad is designed to work like the number pad on a regular PC keyboard.


OCR :    Optical character recognition. The machine identification of printed characters through use of light-sensitive devices.


OCR font :    A font that is recognized by optical character recognition.


Offline :    The state in which the printer is not able to carry out two-way communication with the host.


One-Shot mode :    A scanner mode that requires you to activate the scanner each time you want to scan a bar code. Once you scan a bar code, the scanner turns off.


Online :    1. The state in which the printer is able to carry out two-way communication with the host. 2. An operation in which peripheral devices are connected directly to the processing unit.


Open circuit :    To keep two or more parts electrically separate or disconnected. See also short circuit.


Operating environment :    Generally connotes hardware and software combined; differs from an operating system, which refers to software only.


Operating system :    Refers to the code that operates a computer by managing its file systems, handling user input and output, and running programs. DOS, Windows, and UNIX are all operating systems.


Operator information area :    OIA. A line on a 3270 or 5250 emulator screen that contains status information (for example, input inhibited, keylock, system available) for a terminal session.


Operator software :    A software package that accompanies the 7350 and can be used by the operator to view scanned images or decoded information and configure some of the parameters of the 7350.


Optical head :    Part of the 7350 Wide Area Bar Code Scanner. The optical head is mounted over the conveyor belt and contains the camera and lights.


Optical serial port :    The readerís COM1 is an optical serial port. You can communicate through COM1 using a communications dock, optical link adapter, or another reader if you align the two readersí receive and transmit signals on their optical serial ports.


Optional back :    Optional hardware that extends the features of the basic JANUS 2010 reader. Two optional backs are available: the PCMCIA Back provides a Type II PC card drive, and the RF Back provides RF communications.


OSI model :    Open Systems Interconnection reference model. A framework developed by the International Standards Organization (ISO) to provide worldwide standards for computer communications.


Output mode :    The type of output protocol that is selected with the 7350 software.


Packet :    The unit of information by which the network communicates. A single network message with its associated header, addressing information, data, and optional trailer. A packet can also be called a frame or datagram.


Page :    A group of labels that are always printed together. When labels on a page share the same data, it reduces the number of commands that must be sent to the printer.


PAK :    Program acknowledgment character. Sent from the reader when the received IRL program compiles with no errors.


Parallel :    A communication scheme in which the bits of a byte are transferred simultaneously over a multistrand cable.


Parameters :    1. The operating limits of a device, such as a printer. Also, the variable information sent with a command. 2. In programming, a value assigned to a variable either at the beginning of an operation or before an expression is evaluated by a program.


Parity :    A system for encoding characters with odd or even bar code patterns. Parity provides a self-checking feature in bar codes and other data transmission techniques. Even parity characters have an odd number of binary ones in their structure. For the purposes of data processing and data communications, parity does not relate to whether the original character is odd or even, but how an individual character is made odd or even with the addition of one more bit (1-0).


Parity bit :    A parity bit is added to the binary array to make the sum of all of the bits always odd or always even for a fundamental check.


Parity bit/bar/module :    A parity bit is added to a binary array to make the sum of all of the bits always odd or always even for a fundamental check.


PCB :    Printed circuit board. A flat board whose front contains slots for integrated circuit chips and connections for a variety of electronic components, and whose back is printed with electrically conductive pathways between the components.


PC card :    A PC card is similar to a floppy disk. You can use Type I or II memory PC cards and Type II expansion PC cards. Memory cards provide additional disk storage space, not more executable conventional memory. Expansion cards (also called I/O cards) allow you to connect the reader to I/O devices. PC cards were previously called PCMCIA cards.


PCMCIA :    Personal Computer Memory Card International Association. This group of manufacturers has defined a set of hardware and software standards for memory and expansion PC cards that are available for personal computers.


PC Standard communications protocol :    A communications protocol that handles data transfer on a character-by-character basis or by either filling a receive buffer or transmitting a buffer of data. This protocol is designed to be compatible with the standard PC BIOS functions. The one exception is that the PC Standard protocol can buffer data that is received to avoid losing characters if a program has not checked for data recently.


PDF 417 :    A two-dimensional stacked symbology. Each row in the symbol includes start/stop characters, row identifiers, and symbol characters, which consist of four bars and four spaces each and contain the actual data. PDF 417 provides an extensive error detection and correction option that can recover up to 510 characters lost due to a damaged label or to an error in scanning.


Peer-to-peer network :    A type of LAN whose workstations are capable of being both clients and servers.


Peripheral :    A peripheral is a device connected to a computer; for example, a terminal or printer.


Physical RAM drive :    See RAM drive.


PIC :    Peripheral interface controller. The PIC processor is an internal processor that manages the terminalís batteries.


Picket :    A method of bar code printing in which all the bars are printed at once, in parallel. The bar code appears across the width of the label. Used to be referred to as ďdrag.Ē


Pitch :    1. The number of characters printed in one horizontal inch determined by the increment by which the printer platen moves. 2. Rotation of a bar code symbol about an axis parallel to the direction of the bars.


Pixel :    One spot in a rectilinear grid of thousands of such spots that are individually ďpaintedĒ to form an image produced on the screen by a computer or on paper by a printer. A pixel is the smallest element that display software can manipulate in creating letters, numbers, or graphics.


Plessey Code :    A bar code symbology that is fixed length, continuous, and not self-checking. It is used extensively in libraries. The character set is 0 Ė 9 plus six additional symbols. This symbology includes a start character, data characters, an eight-bit cyclic check digit, a termination bar, and usually a reverse start character. Similar to MSI code.


Point size :    A unit of measurement for font height; 72 points equals 1 inch as measured from slightly above the top of the uppercase letters to slightly below the bottom of the lowercase descenders.


Point-to-Point Protocol :    Communications protocol typically used to connect the reader directly to a computer or terminal. Data sent by the reader is followed by a carriage return and line feed (CR LF). XON/XOFF is supported. Point-to-Point protocol characters cannot be modified; however, the transmission parameters, such as parity and data bits, can be modified.


POL :    Poll character. Sent by the host to request reader data. For User Defined Multi-Drop protocol, you must define a unique character for each reader on a data line.


Poll sequence :    A controller command to a polled device that tells the device to send data.


Polled device :    A device in a network that transmits data in response to an initialization from the controller. If the POL character is not enabled, all Intermec readers and printers will transmit data when the operating system of the device requires data to be transmitted.


Polling :    The act of a computer (or controller) asking end devices if they have information to send to the computer (or controller.)


Polling Mode D :    A protocol that allows devices and controllers to exchange data in an ďask and receiveĒ format. Polling Mode D is used to connect multiple devices to a single multiport controller.


Port :    For hardware, a connecting component that allows a microprocessor to communicate with a peripheral device. For software, a memory address that identifies the physical circuit used to transfer information between a microprocessor and a peripheral device.


Port concentrator :    A device that continuously polls for transactions and passes those transactions to the host. A port concentrator can control from 1 to 16 devices from one master communications port at a time. It also performs the function of time-stamping each transaction.


POST :    Power-on self test. This test runs when you boot the terminal. The test ensures that the terminalís hardware and peripherals are operational.


Postamble :    A field of data that is sent after the data in a message. It is typically used to tag transactions from the bar code reader for rapid processing by the host, and it expands the data field (record) length. See also preamble.


Power management :    Software and procedures that extend the life of a terminal or readerís main battery pack and backup battery.


Preamble :    Predefined data that is automatically appended to the beginning of transmitted data. When preamble is enabled, you must enter a valid Preamble A or B before the reader will send data to the computer. See also postamble.


Precision PrintT :    Trademarked term Intermec uses to describe the software and adjustable hardware features of the 3240 printer that enable it to print high registration labels.


Preferred tree :    The tree you specify that you first want to connect to in a NetWare 4.X network if you have multiple trees. If this tree has a server with a free connection, the NetWare DOS Requester attaches to it.


Presentation space :    The physical space being displayed by the terminal emulator session.


Print speed :    Measured in inches per second (IPS), the rate at which media travels past the printhead.


Printer :    A device controlled by a computer that makes images appear on media. The images can be formed by heat transfer (thermal) or by striking an image on a wheel (impact.)


Printhead :    The mechanism inside the printer that prints.


Printhead elements :    The parts of the printhead that print by placing a mark on the label when heated. In a 3400 printer, ech element is 0.005 square inches in area and is switched on and off separately in order to react with the media or thermal transfer ribbon to create a mark on the label.


Printhead range :    The range over which the resistance of the wires that carry energy to the printhead elements can vary before sending a warning. The wires are tested with each printhead test.


Printhead test :    A test that takes place each time the printer is turned on, or receives a specific command from the host. This test makes sure the resistance of the wires that carry energy to the printhead elements are within the acceptable range, which ensures the temperature of the elements is within the acceptable temperature range.


Program (n.) :    See application.


PROM :    Programmable read only memory. A memory chip that can be programmed once, but cannot be reprogrammed.


Protected field :    In word processing, preset data or an area that cannot be changed or overridden by an operator without altering the program. On a display device, a display field in which a user cannot enter, modify, or erase data. See also unprotected field.


Protocol :    The rules for communication between like processes, providing a means to control the orderly communication of information between stations on a data link.


Protocol character :    See ASCII control character.


Protocol handler :    A protocol handler provides communications services that let a device send data to other devices by transmitting and receiving data as specified by the communications protocol.


Protocol response :    A message from an application or device that either acknowledges the receipt of a transaction, confirms that the transaction was not processed, or sends a message back to the source of the transaction.


Protocol stack :    A group of drivers that work together to span the layers in the network


PSK :    Programmerís Software Kit. A library of software functions for creating applications.


PSS :    Program statement separator character. The PSS indicates the end of an IRL program statement. It separates individual IRL program statements from one another in a block of IRL program statements. PSS must not be defined same as the EOM.


PutImage :    One of two programs you can use to change the contents of drive C. PutImage places an image file created with MkImage on the reader. You can run PutImage only on the reader.


Queue :    A place in RAM to deposit messages when sending from one process to another process in a multitasking environment. A waiting place for data (mailbox.)


Quiet zone :    Area immediately preceding the start character and following the stop character that contains no markings and is free of any extraneous marks. It is quiet in terms of the scanning signal produced.


RAM :    Random access memory. Memory that can be written into, or read, by locating any data address.


RAM drive :    A disk drive that exists only in extended memory in your terminal or reader. You create, read, write, and delete files on a RAM drive the same way you can on a hard disk drive. RAM drives are faster than hard disk drives because the contents of a RAM drive are, by definition, always resident in RAM. The contents are destroyed when you cold boot the device.


RARP server :    Reverse address resolution protocol server. A device that assigns a physical address in response to a query from an IP node. In this query, the IP node supplies its IP address. The RARP server then checks its tables to determine the corresponding physical address.


Raw :    An output mode that is selected for RS-232 and RS-422 interfaces. This mode does not use any flow control during communication.


Read rate :    Ratio of the number of successful reads on the first attempt to the number of attempts.


Reader :    An input device that reads bar codes, converting the input data to electronic data. Typically consists of a scanner, a decoder, and a data communications interface.


Reader command :    A reader command causes the terminal or reader to perform a task. You can enter a reader command by typing on the keypad, by scanning a bar code label, by sending a command from another device on the network, or by sending a command from the host.


Reader Services :    A collection of programs on the reader that decode bar codes, process data input and output, configure the reader, and handle power management.


Reader-to-reader :    A method of communicating between two JANUS readers. By placing two readers so the receive signal on one reader aligns with the transmit signal on the other reader, and the transmit signal on the first reader aligns with the receive signal on the other reader, you can achieve direct communications between the two readers. For this type of communications, the readers should be no more than 1 inch apart.


Ready :    The state in which the printer is able to print; the normal operating state of the printer.


Ready/Busy Line :    Pin 11 of the rear panel connector. Indicates the printer is ready or not ready.


Records per block :    The maximum number of data records transmitted per block of data. A block of data is transmitted during a single transmission event.


Recovery :    When you access the audit file (DCMAUD.DAT,) the data are time-stamped and processed just as if they were being currently collected.


Region :    In screen mapping, a particular area on a screen that can be used to display messages and error conditions. Also referred to as the significant region.


Region message :    In screen mapping, a user-defined string that is sent to the source of the transaction when the region is not detected.


Regular symbol :    Refers to a bar code label that takes the form <start code data stop code>. Regular symbols are transmitted as soon as scanned. See also multiple-read symbol.


Remark out :    When you add a REM statement (short for REMark) at the beginning of a command line in a batch file, DOS treats the line as a remark instead of as a command. Any statement beginning with the characters REM will be ignored by the command processor. Typically, users will remark out device drivers in AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS startup files.


Remote :    When DCM and application programs are installed on physically different computers, one is remote to the other. It is usually the application program that is referred to as remote.


Repeat hop :    Also called repeat count. An action whereby a message is received and then transmitted by a repeater. It is recommended that no more than two repeat hops are used per message.


Repeater :    The repeater extends coverage of the RFDC system by functioning as a message store and forward device.


REQ :    Request for acknowledgment character. Sent by the reader to the host to request a retransmission of an acknowledgment to a reader message.


Requester :    A program that starts up a conversation with a remote partner program. A send requester then sends data to that partner program. A receive requester then receives data from that partner program.


RES :    Reset character. Sent by the reader to end communication with the host. The RES character enables or disables the reset event, or resets the data transmission event to the solicitation event.


Reset event :    Terminates the current data transmission event and resets the communication event to the solicitation event. To enable the reset event, define RES to be other than NULL.


Resume :    When you turn the terminal or reader on, the terminal or reader either resumes exactly where it was when you turned it off, or it boots and restarts your application.


Retry count :    When handshake event is enabled, the retry count is set to three. The polled device decrements the retry count every time the NEG is transmitted. The controller decrements its retry count every time the REQ is transmitted. The reset event occurs when the retry count equals zero.


Retry limit :    The maximum number of times the controller will try to transmit to a particular device before it changes the deviceís status to unreachable. After the retry limit is reached, the controller continue to transmit to the device, but at a slower rate.


RF :    Radio frequency. A frequency at which coherent electromagnetic radiation of energy is useful for communications purposes.


RF data collection system :    Radio frequency data collection system in which the individual components communicate with each other by radio signals. Abbreviated as RFDC system.


RFNC address :    Radio frequency network controllerís address. This address is used by the devices to communicate with the BRUs attached to the controller.


RFPH :    The RF protocol handler, which enables a JANUS 2010 reader with an RF Back to communicate as an end device in an RF network. RFPH lets the reader transmit and receive data as specified by the RF communications protocol.


Ribbon cable :    A cable made of normal, round insulated wires arranged side by side and fastened together by a cohesion process to form a flexible ribbon.


Ribbon save :    An optional device for the printer that disengages the thermal transfer ribbon while labels are being fed forward, or any other time printing does not take place.


Riser :    A board with expansion slots that is designed to connect to the main PCB and holds additional PCBs or ISA cards.58


Rolled-over memory :    A type of dynamic random access memory (DRAM). The JANUS 1MB reader has 1MB of battery-backed DRAM. From the memory existing between the 640K and 1MB boundaries, 384K is remapped or ďrolled-overĒ above 1MB to create the RAM drive. If you do not need the RAM drive, you can access rolled-over memory as extended memory through a device driver or an application that uses HIMEM.SYS.


ROM :    Read only memory. Usually a small memory that contains often-used instructions, such as microprograms or system software. ROM is programmed during memory fabrication and cannot be reprogrammed.


ROM drive :    A read-only memory drive. Drives C and D are ROM drives implemented in flash memory on the reader.


Router :    A software and hardware connection between two or more networks that permits traffic to be routed from one network to another on the basis of the intended destinations of that traffic.


Routing :    Assigning a path for message or file delivery. DCM routes messages and files.


RS-232 :    Widely recognized protocol standard for serial binary data interchange. The standard covers the physical, electrical, and functional characteristics of the interface. RS-232 is the standard American format for serial data transmission by cable (that is, from a computer terminal to a modem). RS-232 transmission uses a distinctive 25-pin connector, although in most cases not all of the conductors are used. See serial.


RS-422 :    Standard for the voltage and impedance levels for serial data transmission on balanced lines. Similar to RS-232, but handles larger distances and faster communication.


RS-485 :    Standard for allowing multiple devices to share a common set of serial data communication lines. The signaling is very similar to RS-422. The maximum number of devices allowed is 32.


RTV :    Room temperature vulcanizer. RTV is a silicone glue used to secure connections.


RUN :    Compile and run IRL program character. Sent by the host to indicate the end of a downloaded program. Causes the reader to compile the program. If the program compiles correctly, the reader runs the program.


RX EOM1 :    Receive end of message first character. Enables or disables receiving data and/or indicates the end of a data block in the receive data event. Older Intermec products may not include these protocol characters. Newer generation online reader products implement these protocol acronyms.


RX EOM2 :    Receive end of message second character. Enables or disables the second character of the RX EOM and indicates the end of a data block in the receive data event. Older Intermec products may not include these protocol characters. Newer generation online reader products implement these protocol acronyms.


Safe place :    A location where the data will not be lost. Storing the message to disk is storing it in a safe place. Receiving confirmation from the application program that it has responsibility for the transaction is considered a safe place.


Scan :    1. To read a bar code with a device known as a scanner, which converts optical information into electrical signals. 2. The search for a symbol that is to be optically recognized. Movement of a light source over a bar code and recognition of the reflective qualities of the returned signal.


Scan line :    The location on the conveyor belt that is viewed by the camera. The scan line can be found by using the oscilloscope, which is provided in the software. The oscilloscope trace identifies anything that is in the scan line.


Scannable :    A symbol that can be successfully scanned and correctly decoded.60


Scanner :    1. An electronic device that converts printed bar code into electrical signals. 2. A device that examines a spatial pattern, one part after another, and generates analog or digital signals corresponding to the pattern. Scanners are often used in mark sensing, pattern recognition, character recognition, and bar code recognition. The scanner converts bar code symbols to electrical signals for input to a bar code reader decoder for processing and subsequent output through a data communications interface.


Scanner mode :    Defines how the scanner operates when the trigger is pulled. There are two types of modes: One-Shot mode and Automatic mode.


Scanner port :    The modular connector on the top of the JANUS reader. Also called the input port. This port may be configured as a scanner port, where a scanner device may be attached, or as COM2 if you use the Intermec COM2 Hardware Adapter.


Scanner timeout :    Maximum time the laser is on. The laser will automatically turn off if timeout occurs before the trigger is released.


Scratch drive :    The physical hard drive that you use to build the JANUS readerís drive images.


Screen :    Any graphical display of data. A screen can be a dialog box, list box, or window.


Screen capture :    A procedure used to create a bitmap of a display from the 7350 software.


Screen event :    In screen mapping, the operation that is performed on the host screen when data collection starts. There are three types of screen events: mapping data (from a transaction field or a static string) onto a host field, taking actions when a region is detected or not detected, and sending a message to the source of the transaction.


Screen mapping :    An application that that allows you to map data fields from a smaller reader screen to larger host application screens. This image can be stored in the host, in the controller, or on the local device.


Screen message :    In screen mapping, a user-defined string that is sent to the source of the transaction after certain screen events.


Script file :    A file that provides instructions for navigating around host application screens. It also provides instructions for mapping transaction fields from the reader to the host application screens.


Security identification :    Defines the password for secured transmission and receipt of data between devices in the wireless network. To communicate, each access point and RF terminal must have matching security IDs.


SEL :    Select character. Sent by the host to request if the reader can accept data. For User Defined Multi-Drop protocol, a unique character should be defined for each reader on a data line.


Select Sequence command :    A controller command to request if a polled device can receive data.


Selective transfer :    A procedure that copies selected formats, fonts, graphics, or pages stored in the memory of one printer to the memry of another.


Self-checking :    Characteristic of a bar code symbology that, without the use of a check digit, allows the bar code to be decoded without an error.


Self-checking bar code :    Self-checking bar code uses an algorithm that can be applied against each character so substitution errors can only occur if two or more independent printing defects appear within a single character.


Self-strip :    An optional device for the printer that presents each label after it is printed, with the backing removed so it may be applied immediately.


Self-Strip mode :    An operationing mode for the 4100 printer that presents each label after it is printed, with the backing removed so it may be applied immediately. This requires the installation of the optional present sensor.


Self-test :    The search for malfunctions in the electrical or mechanical systems of a device by its own actions.


Sensitivity :    The responsiveness to heat of thermal media or thermal transfer ribbon. Sensitivity is determined by the time required for a unit measure of heat to affect the media or ribbon.


Serial :    A communication scheme in which the bits of a byte are transferred one at a time. Often serial transmission is used to link hosts to terminals and PCs to printers.


Serial communications :    With serial communications, data is transmitted one bit at a time over a single line from one computer to another. Often serial communications link hosts to terminals and PCs to printers.


Serial communications parameters :    Parameters that control serial communications from one device to another, such as baud rate and parity.


Serial port :    A link between a microcomputer and a peripheral device through which data is transmitted.


Server :    A computer that is configured to provide services to the network, such as files and programs. See also client.


Session :    A single runtime copy of a 3270 or 5250 terminal emulator, through which a host application can be accessed.


Session pooling :    The controller establishes one 3270 or 5250 terminal session upline to an IBM host. Then, multiple 3270 or 5250 devices downline from the controller can log in to the controller and send data asynchronously to the host. Each device does not need to establish a separate terminal session.


Set illumination screen :    A screen in the 7350 software that is used to calibrate the lighting after lamps have been replaced. This screen contains an oscilloscope that displays objects in the scan line.


Setup utility :    A screen in the 7350 software that contains commands used for calibrating the 7350. This screen contains an oscilloscope that displays objects in the scan line.


SFM :    Shop floor management. The part of the factory data environment that is responsible for the daily up-to-the-minute tracking of materials and labor. It manages and generates reports pertaining to scheduling and dispatch of materials, labor, and work order status.


Shell out feature :    Feature that allows you to go to the DOS command line without exiting the installation utility.


Shield :    A covering on the light bar that protects the lamps.


Short circuit :    To connect two or more parts together electrically. See also open circuit.


SIMM :    Single inline memory module. A printed circuit board that holds several semiconductor memory chips and is used to add memory to the Access Point.


Skip :    To move the paper to the next label in your printer.


SNA :    System network architecture. This is IBMís data communication architecture defining levels of protocols for communications between terminals and applications and between programs.


SNMP :    Simple network management protocol. A protocol used to manage the network activity of different devices.


Soft font :    A file stored in the printer to provide the ability to print text using fonts that are not resident in the printer.


Software :    Coded instructions that direct the operation of a computer. A set of such instructions for accomplishing a particular task is referred to as a program. See also firmware.


Solicitation event :    A communication event that initiates data transmission. The solicitation can be either a poll or select sequence. To enable solicitation, define POL to be other than NULL.


SOM :    Start of message character. The first character in messages sent to or received from the host.


SOP :    Start of program block character. Sent by the host at the beginning of a block of IRL program statements.


Space :    The light element of a printed bar code symbol. The white lines.


Special keys :    Keys that perform specific functions within the user interface portion of DCM. The Page Up and Page Down keys are special keys.


Specular reflection :    The abrupt change in direction of a light beam at an interface between two dissimilar media so that the light beam returns into the medium of origin. Reflection from a smooth surface is specular. Reflection from a rough surface is diffuse.


Spread spectrum :    A radio data transmission modulation technique by which the transmitted signal is spread over a bandwidth wider than the information bandwidth.


SPX :    Sequenced packet exchange protocol. This protocol provides a method for two workstations or applications to communicate across the network. SPX works with IPX to deliver the messages. However, SPX guarantees the delivery of the messages and maintains the order of messages on the packet stream.


SRAM drive :    Static RAM. See RAM drive.


SRAM PC card :    A type of memory PC card that provides additional disk storage space, not more executable conventional memory, on the reader. An SRAM card has a lithium battery to back up data for the life of the battery.


Standard protocol :    A communications protocol capable of controlling communications between two devices connected by a single data communication line.


Standard upgrade :    The process that allows you to make sure your JANUS reader has the most current version of firmware and that it has the default configuration.


Standoff :    A plastic peg used to support a PCB at a distance from the surface on which the PCB is mounted.


Start and Stop characters :    A special bar code character that provides the scanner with start and stop reading instructions as well as a scanning direction indicator. The start character is normally at the left end of a horizontally oriented symbol (bar code label). The stop character is normally at the right end of a horizontally oriented symbol. For Code 39, the asterisk (*) character is used. Depending on the software they use, users may not have to enter the start and stop codes when they create their own bar code labels.


Status :    The state, condition, or current value of a device, program, or command.


Stop bits :    A bit that signals the end of a character. One of the serial communications parameters.


Storage mode :    A power management mode on the reader that lets you preserve the life of the lithium backup battery. Place the reader in Storage mode if you will not use the reader for 1 week or more. While the reader is in Storage mode, the NiCad battery pack must be removed; otherwise, the reader slowly drains the battery pack and backup battery. All data in conventional memory is lost when the reader enters Storage mode.


Store and forward :    A method where messages are temporarily stored in the controller before they are transmitted to their destination. It is used when the upline network or host application is temporarily stopped.


Subnet mask :    A mask that is used in the IP protocol to separate the subnet address from the local IP address. The IP protocol performs a bit-wise AND on the IP address and the subnet mask. Each address segment represents one byte, where 255 converts to FF hex. For example, if the IP address is 192.009.150.184 and the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, the subnet address is 192.009.150.


Subnetwork :    A section of a large network that functions as an independent network, but does not appear separate to remote networks.67


Suspend mode :    The mode the terminal or reader enters when you press q to turn it off. In Suspend mode, the terminal or reader saves all memory and turns off the power to most of the hardware. Contrast with resume.


Symbology :    A scheme for encoding data as bar code. Code 39, Interleaved 2 of 5, and Codabar are examples of different symbologies.


Syntax :    The way in which commands or data are put together.


System administrator :    The person responsible for installing, configuring, and maintaining the networks and computers in your company.


TCP :    Transmission control protocol. This protocol provides a method for creating a connection-oriented, reliable, error-free, full-duplex, byte-stream communication between two processes. See also IP.


TE Configuration Menu :    A menu-driven application that lets you configure 3270, 5250, or VTXXX/ANSI terminal emulation parameters. You can access the TE Configuration Menu at any time during a terminal emulation session.


Telegram mode :    An output mode that can communicate with Kosan Krisplantģ sorters.


Telnet :    The TCP/IP remote terminal protocol for connection to a login server.


Terminal emulation :    TE. A device that is running terminal emulation looks like the terminal. For example, it uses no CPU, no RAM, and no hard disk. Two general classifications are devices running in Character mode and those running in Block mode. Character mode devices emulate VTXXX terminals where a character travels all the way from the host to a device and back. Block mode devices emulate 3270 or 5250 terminals where entire screens are sent to a device, the user fills in all the data fields on the device, and sends the entire screen back to the host.


Terminal IP address :    Identifies the IP address assigned to the TRAKKER 2425 terminal. The IP address you set on the terminal must match the address that is set on the Model 200 Controller.


Terminal license :    A license that you can purchase from Intermec that determines how many devices you can simultaneously use to communicate with the Model 200 Controller.


Terminal session :    A terminal session is an active communication link between a device and the host. See also session pooling.


Terminal template :    A file that contains a menu of screens for data collection devices. The template is downloaded to the devices from the Model 200 Controller or the devices can use the reader program to request the template.


Terminal template application :    An application that runs on the data collection device that requests and runs the templates for 3270 or 5250 screen mapping.


Tex :    Human-readable alphanumeric characters, as opposed to machine-readable bar codes.


Text mode :    One of two display modes on the reader. By default, the reader uses Text mode and you can set the display size to 25 x 80, 16 x 20, 8 x 20, 16 x 10, and 8 x 10. If your application only recognizes DOS mode, you must use a display size of 25 x 80 or 25 x 40. The other display sizes are not DOS standard and are for use with custom applications. Text mode also supports two character attributes: blinking and reverse video. Contrast with graphics mode.


Thermal transfer :    A method of printing by which heat from the printhead melts ink from the ribbon onto media. The ink adheres to the media as it cools.


Time append :    A controller feature that stamps the time to incoming messages at specified intervals. The time appears with the messages as they are received at the controller.


Time broadcast :    A controller feature that broadcasts the current time (may include a short message) to the data collection devices. The time is updated at specified intervals.


Timeout :    A defined time allowed for an event after which an alternative action is taken.


Timeout delay :    The time the reader waits between received characters before an I/O (input/output) error occurs.


Token Ring :    A type of LAN that transfers data at either 4 or 16 Mbits/s. It is a network transport technology in which a token is passed around a ring topology.


Top-of-form :    The point where printing can start on a label. Separated from the edge of the label by the margin.


TRAKKER Antares 2400 Menu System :    A menu-driven application that lets you configure the terminal, view system information, and run diagnostics. You can access the TRAKKER 2400 Menu System while running any application.


Transaction :    1. Individual event (such as receipts, issues, and transfers) reported to the computer system. 2. A group of one or more message fields. 3. A transaction is made up of a header and a group of fields. For example, a work order transaction might have a transaction type and three fields consisting of a work order number, part number, and due date.


Transaction manager :    See reader.70


Trigger mode :    The conditions that turn the laser on and off. See also Edge Trigger mode and Level Trigger mode.


TSR program :    Terminate and stay resident program. A DOS program that remains loaded in conventional memory after you have terminated it. You must explicitly unload the TSR if you want to free the conventional memory it is using.


Turnaround delay :    The amount of time a polled device waits after receiving a character before transmitting any response to the controller.


Twinaxial :    A type of cable used to connect the controller directly to an IBM host. Twinaxial cables consist of an outer layer of insulation, an outer conductor, another insulating layer, and two side-by-side center conductors. See also coaxial.


Two of Five Code :    See 2 of 5 Code.


TX EOM1 :    Transmit end of message first character. Enables or disables the transmission of the TX EOM characters and/or indicates the end of a data block in the data transmission event. Older Intermec products may not include these protocol characters. Newer generation online reader products implement these protocol acronyms.


TX EOM2 :    Transmit end of message second character. Enables or disables the second character of the TX EOM and indicates the end of a data block in the data transmission event. Older Intermec products may not include these protocol characters. Newer generation online reader products implement these protocol acronyms.


UART :    Universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter. A device that performs asynchronous communication functions by converting parallel digital output from a DTE into serial bit transmission and vice versa.


UART buffer :    Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter buffer. The UART buffer contains bytes of data being sent or received by the reader. The FIFO control register controls how the UART buffer operates.


UDC :    User-defined character. See graphic.


UDF :    User-defined fonts. See soft font.


UDP :    1. User-defined protocol. UDP is a custom communications protocol that can be modified to meet specific host requirements. For example, you can configure User-Defined protocol to act like a Point-to-Point protocol, except that it requires an LRC and an acknowledgement from the receiver. You can also define the communications characters such as SOM, POL, or SEL, or disable these characters by setting them to null. 2. User datagram protocol. This protocol is an alternative to TCP. This protocol is the Internet standard for wireless devices. You can use UDP when you do not need a guaranteed delivery. You can also use UDP when you do not require all the services of TCP.


UDP Plus :    User datagram protocol plus. This Intermec-designed protocol is based on UDP. UDP Plus improves the performance of devices in a mobile wireless environment. Intermec uses this protocol to communicate between the controller and TRAKKER Antares 2425 terminals.


Unit :    See module.


UNIX user name :    Parameter that is a variable in the DOS environment. The UNIX user name identifies the user to the Novell software running on a remote host.


Unprotected field :    A displayed field in which a user can enter, modify, or delete data. See also protected field.


UPC :    Universal product code. A numeric, 12-digit bar code symbology used extensively in retail, particularly the grocery industry.


UPC/EAN Code :    Universal product code (UPC) is a subset of the European article numbering (EAN). The EAN code is also referred to as world product code (WPC) and international article numbering (IAN). It is used in marking items for retail sale. This code is fixed length, continuous, and weakly self-checking. It requires close printing tolerances. The character set is 0 Ė 9. Its maximum character density is 13.8 numeric characters per inch.


Upline :    1. A device that is at the computer end of a connection between a computer and a device is referred to as being upline. When devices are connected to a computer, they are connected in a line. Upline is a direction relative to the device, in contrast to downline. 2. If more than one computer is connected in a line, the upline computers usually handle data processing and the downline computers usually handle data collection and sometimes some data preprocessing.


Upper memory area :    The area between the 640K and 1024K. The upper memory area is physically composed of a 256K flash ROM chip (system flash) and the video memory chip. Like a PC, this area contains the BIOS and video buffers. On the reader, the upper memory area also contains PC card memory and ROM DOS. The 384K upper memory area maps just above 640K conventional memory. utility A program that provides general computing functions, such as file copying and program cross referencing. See also application.


Validation :    Comparing data with known information (patterns, ranges, check digits) to verify that the data is correct.


Validation file :    An ASCII file that has one entry per line. A validation file is used to ensure that the information entered in the input fields of a screen mapping screen are correct. The file is read sequentially and the last line in the ASCII file must be <EOF>.


Variable data field :    Bar code and text fields that change from one label to the next.


Variable length :    A type of symbology in which the number of characters per symbol is not restricted. It is the opposite of fixed length.


Variable length code :    A code that can be of any length within a range of lengths, commonly with a maximum length specified and frequently with a minimum length also specified.


Variable length field :    A data field or data element that may vary within a prescribed minimum and maximum.


Version A :    Standard 12-digit UPC symbol.


Version E :    Special 6-digit shortened UPC code that requires less space and uses zero suppression.


Viewport :    A method for viewing a full size terminal or reader screen with the display. You see only a limited number of lines and characters of data at one time. Use the display as a viewport to move around and see the entire screen.


Virtual display :    A PC-size screen (25 x 80) accessible through the readerís smaller display for applications that need to be PC compatible. You can see 16 rows and 20 characters of the virtual display at one time. By moving the viewport, you use the readerís virtual display of 25 lines by 80 charactersóthe same size as a PC screen.


Virtual Wedge :    A Reader Services feature that lets the reader decode bar codes, making the reader functionally equivalent to a wedge reader connected to a PC.


VMU :    Vehicle mount unit. A device that is designed to be mounted on a vehicle.


Volatile :    Refers to memory that is not saved when power is lost or turned off. See also nonvolatile.


Voting :    A laser scanner parameter that takes more than one (low setting) or one more than low (high setting) matching scans from the same label to yield a good read. This is useful when scanning poor quality labels that may cause substitution errors. This is for laser scanning only.


VT/ANSI terminal emulation :    A straight-through terminal emulation that causes Intermec downline devices running terminal emulation to emulate a VT100, VT220, and VT320, or ANSI terminal.


Warm boot :    One of two ways to boot the reader; compare to cold boot. A warm boot performs the power-on self test (POST) to ensure that the hardware and peripherals are operational, runs CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT, and displays the DOS prompt. The contents of both conventional memory and the physical RAM drive (drive E) remain intact. You may warm boot the reader to execute startup files, such as AUTOEXEC.BAT, that have changed. You may also warm boot to start Interlnk.


WAN :    Wide area network, which is distributed over a large area and involves routing nodes. Compare to LAN.


Wedge reader :    A bar code reader that connects to a PC. The wedge lets you scan bar code and enters the data into the PC as if it were typed at the keyboard.


Wide to narrow ratio :    The comparison of the widest bar in a bar code symbol to the narrowest bar. Expressed as a ratio such as 2:1 or 2.5:1.


X dimension :    The width of the narrowest element in a bar code symbol. An element can be a bar or a space.75


XMODEM :    A protocol that allows you to send commands to and communicate through a modem.


XOFF :    Defines a character that disables the transmission event. The receiving device sends XOFF when its receive buffers are nearly full of data. Older Intermec products may not include these protocol characters. Newer generation online reader products implement these protocol acronyms.


XON :    Enables or disables XON/XOFF flow control and defines a character that reenables transmission when the device can receive data again after an XOFF. Older Intermec products may not include these protocol characters. Newer generation online reader products implement these protocol acronyms.


XON/XOFF :    A type of software flow control for communication between digital devices. It stops the host from sending data when the device buffer fills up (XOFF) and starts it again when the buffer empties (XON).


Z dimension :    The achieved width of the narrow elements, calculated as the average of the average narrow bar width and the average narrow space width.



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